Reading Logs

I’ve used a myriad of reading logs throughout my years of teaching, most of which went by the wayside and were eventually “deep-sixed” into the recycling bin.

In order to cultivate a classroom of readers, I knew that this year had to be different. I wanted to allow students to reflect on their reading and to hear what their peers were reading. I also wanted the reading log to be purposeful and not seem like “busy-work” to students.

reading-logs

The reading log I use (adapted from this reading log) asks students to create a reading goal for when they want to finish the book. I tell my students that if they do not reach their goal, it’s okay; however, I also want them to experience how amazing it feels to reach your goal. Already, many students have finished their book before their intended goal and they are super excited, proclaiming “I’m finished!!!” Having only been in school three weeks, seeing students finish one or two books so early in the school year makes me smile 🙂

I modeled how to fill out the reading log on the first day I showed it to students. The log requires students to add up the total number of pages they read each day. This was confusing for some of my lower-level learners, so extra modeling may be needed. After about 15 minutes of reading, I give students about four minutes to circle a sentence starter and write their reactions. They circle a different sentence starter for each day.

Afterwards, I allow two students to share what they wrote. This serves as a mini book-talk and I walk around the room Vanna White style showcasing their book. At the end of the week, students fill out the goal reflection portion on the back of the log. They add up the total number of pages read that week, which usually results in some students shocking themselves by how much they’ve read!

There is also a space for their grade (each day is worth 5 points) and teacher feedback. I tell my students the reading log should be an easy 100% as long as they follow directions, as I grade based upon thoughtfulness and completeness.

As the year progresses, I will likely change the sentence starters and make them more advanced. I may also increase the response length from 3-5 sentences to 5-7 sentences.

Keeping routines consistent is key for middle school students and the reading log is a fantastic way to hold students accountable for their learning!

Do you use reading logs? What do you find useful and effective with your students?

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